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Australian Native Birth Flowers for Every Month of the Year

Australia is rich in unique flora, and what better way to celebrate this diversity than through birth flowers?

Each month, the Australian landscape offers a different native plant, reflecting the varied and extraordinary beauty of our country.

This guide not only highlights the birth flowers for each month but also shares their cultural significance and practical growing tips.

It’s a journey through the year, showcasing the unique charm of Australian native plants.

January: Hibbertia

Hibbertia scandens flower | Plant varieties

Origin and Characteristics

Hibbertia, or Guinea Flower, with its vibrant yellow blooms, symbolises happiness and positivity. This plant is a cheerful presence in the Australian bush.

Growing Tips

Hibbertia thrives in well-drained soil and full sun, making it a fantastic choice for rockeries and native garden settings.

February: Brachyscome

Brachyscome angustifolia Rock Daisy | Plant varieties

Origin and Characteristics

Brachyscome, often known as the Australian Daisy, features delicate, daisy-like flowers. It represents beauty and patience and comes in shades of blue, purple, and white.

Growing Tips

Ideal for well-drained soil and sunny positions. Brachyscome is perfect for containers and garden borders, adding a touch of delicacy.

March: Grevillea

Grevillea ‘Peaches and Cream | Plant varieties

Origin and Characteristics

Grevillea, with its distinctive spider-like flowers, is a symbol of resilience and versatility. These plants are important for native birds, providing ample nectar.

Growing Tips

Grevilleas prefer well-drained soil and full sun. They are excellent for attracting wildlife and adding vibrant colour to gardens.

April: Eremophila

Eremophila nivea Emu Bush 1 | Plant varieties

Origin and Characteristics

Eremophila, commonly known as Emu Bush, has tubular flowers that symbolise adaptation and endurance. Its unique blooms are a testament to the rugged Australian landscape.

Growing Tips

Eremophila plants are adaptable to various soil types but thrive best in full sun. They are ideal for creating a bushland feel in your garden.

May: Crowea (Waxflower)

Crowea Waxflower | Plant varieties

Origin and Characteristics

Crowea, also known as Waxflower, symbolises good health and healing. These charming flowers, typically pink or white, are a staple in Australian native gardens.

Growing Tips

Crowea flourishes in well-drained, slightly acidic soil and partial shade. They are perfect for adding a delicate touch to garden beds and pots.

June: Hardenbergia (Happy Wanderer or Purple Coral Pea)

Hardenbergia violacea flower 1 | Plant varieties

Origin and Characteristics

Hardenbergia, known as Happy Wanderer or Purple Coral Pea, represents strength and endurance. Its vibrant purple blooms add a splash of colour during winter.

Growing Tips

This vigorous climber loves well-drained soil and a sunny to partly shaded spot. Ideal for covering fences or trellises.

July: Adenanthos

Adenanthos sericeus Woolly Bush flower | Plant varieties

Origin and Characteristics

Adenanthos, with its unique and soft foliage, symbolises fascination and uniqueness. This plant is a distinctive feature of the Australian bush.

Growing Tips

Adenanthos thrives in sandy, well-drained soil and full sun. It’s an excellent choice for low-maintenance and water-wise gardens.

August: Correa (Native Fuchsia)

Correa | Plant varieties

Origin and Characteristics

Correa, also known as Native Fuchsia, stands for elegance and modesty. Its bell-shaped flowers vary in color from red to green and are a favourite of nectar-feeding birds.

Growing Tips

Correa plants prefer well-drained soil and can tolerate both full sun and partial shade. They’re great for underplanting and attracting wildlife.

September: Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus caesia plant | Plant varieties

Origin and Characteristics

Eucalyptus, synonymous with the Australian landscape, symbolises protection and abundance. These towering trees are iconic for their fragrant leaves and bark.

Growing Tips

Most eucalyptus species require well-drained soil and plenty of sun. They are perfect for large spaces and creating a bold statement in the garden.

October: Callistemon (Bottlebrush)

Callistemon | Plant varieties

Origin and Characteristics

Callistemon, commonly known as Bottlebrush, represents resilience and adaptability. Its distinctive red brush-like flowers are a stunning feature in any garden.

Growing Tips

Bottlebrush plants are hardy and adaptable, thriving in a variety of soil types. They prefer full sun and can tolerate drought once established.

November: Leptospermum (Tea Tree)

Leptospermum scoparium plant | Plant varieties

Origin and Characteristics

Leptospermum, or Tea Tree, symbolises renewal and regeneration. It’s known for its delicate flowers and aromatic leaves, commonly used in essential oils.

Growing Tips

Tea Trees are versatile and can grow in various soil types, though they prefer a sunny position. They’re excellent for hedges and screens.

December: Banksia

Banksia | Plant varieties

Origin and Characteristics

Banksia, with its unique cylindrical flowers, stands for new beginnings and endurance. These plants are quintessentially Australian and attract a variety of wildlife.

Growing Tips

Banksias prefer sandy, well-drained soil and full sun. They are ideal for natural-style gardens and coastal landscapes.

Photo of author

Linda Jones

Based in sunny Brisbane, Linda has a keen interest in ornamental plants. She firmly believes that gardens are as much about aesthetics as they are about functionality. Despite being a life-long gardener, she still enjoys learning about new plants and gardening techniques and sharing her discoveries with the Ultimate Backyard community. When she's not immersed in her garden, Linda loves reading and walking.

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